Bibliographia. Annotated Bibliographies (www.bibliographia.co)

by Raul Corazzon | e-mail: rc@ontology.co

Synoptic Problem: Bibliography of the main studies in English from 1964 (Gre - Klo)

Contents

The Bibliography is composed by the following sections:

Studies (mainly from 1964) in alphabetical order:

1: A - Bro

2: Buc - Day

3: De - Fee

4: Fit - Gou

5: Gre - Klo (current page)

6: Kni - Mey

7: Mic - Pat

8: Pea - Row

9: San - Tri

10: Tuc - Z

Bibliography of studies on Synopsis - Concordances - Harmonies of the Gospels

N.B. Some abstracts will be added in the near future.

Studies on the Synoptic Problem

  1. Green, H. Benedict. 1984. "The Credibility of Luke's Transformation of Matthew." In Synoptic Studies: The Ampleforth Conferences of 1982 and 1983, edited by Tuckett, Christopher M., 131-156. Sheffield: JSOT Press.

  2. ———. 1984. "Matthew 12.22-50 and Parallels: An Alternative to Matthean Conflation." In Synoptic Studies: The Ampleforth Conferences of 1982 and 1983, edited by Tuckett, Christopher M., 157-176. Sheffield: JSOT Press.

  3. ———. 1989. "Matthew, Clement and Luke: their Sequence and Relationship." The Journal of Theological Studies no. 40:1-25.

  4. Greenberg, Gary. 2020. The Case for a Proto-Gospel: Recovering the Common Written Source Behind Mark and John. New York: Peter Lang.

  5. Gregory, Andrew. 2011. "What Is Literary Dependence?" In New Studies in the Synoptic Problem: Oxford Conference, April 2008: Essays in Honour of Christopher M. Tuckett edited by Foster, Paul, Gregory, Andrew F., Kloppenborg, John S. and Verheyden, Joseph, 87-114. Leuven: Peeters.

  6. Griesbach, Johann Jakob. 1978. "A demonstration that Mark was written after Matthew and Luke." In J. J. Griesbach: Synoptic and Text-Critical Studies, 1776-1976, edited by Orchard, Bernard and Longstaff, Thomas R. W., 103-135. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    A translation of J. J. Griesbach's Commentatio qua Marci Evangelium totum e Matthaei et Lucae commentariis decerptum esse monstratur (1789, revised 1794) by Bernard Orchard.

  7. Gundry, Robert H. 1992. "Matthean Foreign Bodies in Agreements of Luke with Matthew against Mark Evidence that Luke Used Matthew." In The Four Gospels 1992: Festschrift Frans Neirynck. Volume II, edited by van Segbroeck, Frans, Tuckett, Christopher M., van Belle, Gilbert and Verheyden, Joseph, 1467-1495. Leuven: Leuven University Press / Peeters.

  8. ———. 1995. " A Rejoinder On Matthean Foreign Bodies in Luke 10,25-28." Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses no. 71:139-150.

  9. ———. 1999. "The Refusal of Matthean Foreign Bodies to Be Exorcised from Luke 9,22; 10, 25-28." Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses no. 75:104-22.

  10. Günther, Heinz O. 1991. "The Sayings Gospel Q and the Quest for Aramaic Sources: Rethinking Christian Origins." Semeia no. 55:41-76.

    Abstract: "The assumption that a productive and vital Aramaic tradition gave rise to early Christianity has haunted critical New Testament scholarship since its inception some 200 years ago. The traditional image of Christianity's birth in the Aramaic-speaking milieu of Palestine, together with the idea of the church's gradual expansion into the Hellenistic world, has made scholarship search unabatingly for Q's Aramaic ancestors. Fanciful translation hypotheses, prompted by Q's Semitisms and its LXXal style, are coupled in the literature with speculations about the transformation of Q's early apocalyptic outlook on history into a manual of sapiential instructions intended to shape Mediterranean life and culture. A closer comparison of the arguments advanced in support of or in opposition to this assumption reveals its problematic nature. Studies of the evolution of Q from a compilation of sayings into a Sayings Gospel have opened new vistas from within the document itself. Q's portrait of Jesus as Sophia's most trusted envoy, along with the literary devices employed by the Q redactors to flesh out their vision of Jesus, suggests strongly that at each stage of its evolution the document was at home, in language and in thought, in the Hellenistic milieu of Galilee and Syria."

  11. Gupta, Nijay K. 2020. A Beginner's Guide to New Testament Studies: Understanding Key Debates. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic.

    Chapter 1. The Synoptic Problem, pp. 1-14.

  12. Gustaffson, Daniel. 2016. "Luke's Rewriting of the Markan Mélange of Christological Titles (Mark 8.27-33 par.; 12.35-37 par.; 14.55-64 par.)." In Luke's Literary Creativity, edited by Nielsen, Jesper Tang and Müller, Mogens, 185-207. New York: Bloomsbury.

  13. Guthrie, Donald. 1990. New Testament Introduction. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

    Fourth revised edition (First edition 1961).

    Chapter Five: The Synoptic Problem, pp. 136-208.

  14. Guy, Harold H. 1972. "Did Luke Use Matthew?" The Expository Times no. 83:245-247.

  15. Hägerland, Tobias. 2019. "Editorial Fatigue and the Existence of Q." New Testament Studies:190-206.

    Abstract: "This article challenges Mark Goodacre's contention that the distribution of editorial fatigue in Matthew and Luke points not only to Markan priority but also to Luke's dependence on Matthew. Goodacre's argument is criticised through questioning the assumptions that Matthew's handling of Q would have been analogous to his handling of Mark and to Luke's handling of Q, as well as the claim that no instances of editorial fatigue can be detected in Matthew's handling of the double tradition. The conclusion is that the argument from editorial fatigue cannot be used to establish that the existence of Q is improbable."

  16. Hagner, Donald A. 2012. The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction. Grand rapids, MI: Baker Academic.

    Chapter 9: The Synoptic Problem, pp. 131-153; Chapter 10: Q as an Entity, pp. 154-162.

  17. Hamann, H. P. 1970. "Sic et Non: Are We So Sure of Matthean Dependence on Mark?" Concordia Theological Monthly no. 41:462-469.

  18. Hamilton, Catherine Sider, and Willits, Joel, eds. 2019. Writing the Gospels: A Dialogue with Francis Watson. London: T & T Clark.

    Contents: List of Contributors IX; Preface X; Permissions XII; Abbreviations XIII;

    Catherine Sider Hamilton: Introduction: Francis Watson's Gospel Writing and The Fourfold Gospel: engaging a "New Paradigm" 1

    Part I. Critical assessments of Gospel Writing and The Fourfold Gospel

    Chapter 1. Richard Bauckham: Gospels before normativization: a critique of Francis Watson's Gospel Writing 17; Chapter 2. Markus Bockmuehl: Fourfold Gospel writing 40;

    Part II. Gospel writing and Gospel sources

    Chapter 3. Richard A. Burridge: Ancient biography and the development of the canonical collection 63; Chapter 4. Mark Goodacre: What does Thomas have to do with Q? The afterlife of a sayings Gospel 81;

    Chapter 5. Jens Schroter: Gospels in the First and Second century and the origin of the "Fourfold Gospel": a critical appraisal of Francis Watson's Gospel Writing 90;

    Part III. Gospel Writing and The Fourfold Gospel

    Chapter 6. Jonathan T. Pennington: Revelatory epistemology in the Gospel according to Matthew in dialogue w8ith Francis Watson's "Canonical Perspective" 103; Chapter 7. Joshua W. Jipp: Messiah language and Gospel writing 126; Chapter 8. Catherine Sider Hamilton: Quartet for the End of Time: the Fourfold Gospel, hitotry and Matthew's birth narrative 145; Chapter 9. Frederik S. Mulder: Gospel contradictions, harmonizations, and historical truth: Francis Watson and Origen's comprehensive paradigm shift 166;

    Chapter 10. Margaret M. Mitchell: Gospel optics 184; Chapter 11. Ephraim Radner: Singing the Gospels: beyond the bookish text 206;

    Part IV. Francis Watson's Response

    Chapter 12. Francis Watson: A reply to my critics 227;

    Bibliography 249; Index of Subjects 264; Index of Scripture and Other Ancient Sources 268-275.

  19. Harrington, Jay M. 2000. The Lukan Passion Narrative: the Markan Material in Luke 22,54 - 23,25: a Historical Survey: 1891-1997. Leiden: Brill.

    "The passion narrative has been and continues to be one of the most studied sections of the Gospel of Luke. The problem is that many differences exist between the Lukan account and the passion in Mk, encompassing at times the absence of some material and the addition of other material as well as the difference in the order of various accounts. Our purpose is to reexamine the use of the Markan material in Lk. In recent years the discussion has once more focused on the question of Luke’s sources as part of ongoing source-critical and redaction-critical research. The issue of Luke’s use of a special source (or sources) for his passion narrative has again generated much scholarly debate. Consequently, some believe that the discussion has arrived at an impasse4. Led by proponents of the new literary criticism, a number of exegetes now prescind from source-critical investigation, and even from any supposition concerning sources.

    Although the Lukan passion narrative has been the focus of much analysis, no adequate history has sketched the contours of the debate. Our goal is not only to present a recent history, but to trace the discussion to its beginnings. We have generally followed a combination of a chronological and systematic order alternating between proponents and opponents of the theory of a special source or sources. It has also been our intention to report dependence of scholars upon one another.

    The survey, covering roughly the period from the 1880’s to 1997, is divided into two major sections. The first details the development from P. Feine through the 1960’s. The second period begins with the work of G. Schneider and continues up through 1997. In the treatment of each scholar’s position, insofar as it is possible, we review their underlying Synoptic theory, their source theory as applied to the passion in general, then the trial of Pilate, and finally any contributions regarding the trial before Herod. Three appendices are provided: 1) Special LQ vocabulary and constructions according to J. Weiss, 2) Lukan priority theories, and 3) the Gospel of Peter and its relation to the Herod pericope." (pp. XI-XII, note omitted)

  20. Havener, Ivan. 1987. Q, the Sayings of Jesus: With a reconstruction of Q by Athanasius Polag. Wimington (DE): Glazier.

  21. Hawkins, John C. 1911. "Three Limitations to St. Luke's Use of St. Mark's Gospel." In Studies in the Synoptic Problem By Members of The University of Oxford edited by Sanday, William, 29-94. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

    1. The Disuse of the Marcan Source in St. Luke ix. 51-xviii. 14

    2. The Great Omission by St. Luke of the Matter contained in St. Mark vi. 45-viii. 16

    3. St. Luke's Passion-Narrative considere with reference to the Synoptic Piobiem.

  22. ———. 1911. "Probabilities as to the So-Called Double Tradition of St. Matthew and St. Luke." In Studies in the Synoptic Problem By Members of The University of Oxford edited by Sanday, William, 95-138. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

  23. Hays, Christopher. 2008. "Marcion vs. Luke: A Response to the Plädoyer of Matthias Klinghardt." Zeitschrift für die Neutestamentliche Wissenschaft und Kunde der Älteren Kirche no. 99:213-232.

    "Considerable mystery enfolds Marcion of Sinope, the notorious second century heresiarch, since none of the documents he bequeathed to history survive directly." (p. 213)

    (...)

    "One topic generated particularly heated debate, that of the relation between the Gospel of Luke and the Gospel of Marcion.

    Sparked by Johann Salomo Semler in 1783, the controversy raged until 1921, when Adolf von Harnack’s magisterial monograph reaffirmed the traditional position that Marcion excised portions from Luke.(2) Though the alternative thesis cropped up only sporadically during the 20th century, a small contingent of scholars have recently reopened the question, including the recent learned essay of Matthias Klinghardt “Markion vs. Lukas: Plädoyer für die Wiederaufnahme eines alten Falles.”(5)" (pp. 213-214, a note omitted)

    (...)

    "Though Klinghardt considers the historically broad assent to Harnack’s later, critically grounded reaffirmation of the position to have been prematurely dismissive (485), he has not yet overturned Harnack’s case. The cumulative weight of internal evidence and considerations of dating corroborate the external testimony to Lukan priority over Marcion’s Gospel, though whether the document which Marcion edited is

    identical with the canonical Third Gospel remains a viable question." (p. 232)

    (2) A. von Harnack, Marcion: Das Evangelium vom fremden Gott: Eine Monographie zur Geschichte der Grundlegung der katholischen Kirche (TU 15), Leipzig 1921.

    (5) M. Klinghardt, Markion vs. Lukas: Plädoyer für die Wiederaufnahme eines alten Falles, NTS 52 (2006) 484–513.

  24. Head, Peter M. 1997. Christology and the Synoptic Problem: An Argument for Markan Priority. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  25. ———. 2011. "Textual Criticism and the Synoptic Problem." In New Studies in the Synoptic Problem. Oxford Conference, April 2008: Essays in Honour of Christopher M. Tuckett edited by Foster, P., Gregory, A., Kloppenborg, John S. and Verheyden, Joseph, 115-156. Leuven: Peeters.

  26. Heard, Richard. 1954. "The Aφomnhmoneymata in Papias, Justin, and Irenaeus." New Testament Studies no. 1:122-129.

  27. ———. 1954. "Papias' Quotations from the New Testament." New Testament Studies no. 1:130-134.

  28. Hedrick, Charles W. 2011. "The Parables and the Synoptic Problem." In New Studies in the Synoptic Problem, Oxford Conference, April 2008. Essays in Honour of Christopher M. Tuckett, edited by Foster, Paul, Gregory, Andrew F., Kloppenborg, John S. and Verheyden, Joseph, 321-345. Leuven: Peeters.

  29. Henaut, Barry W. 1988. "Is Q but the Invention of Luke and Mark? Method and Argument in the Griesbach Hypothesis." Religious Studies and Theology no. 8:15-32.

  30. Hengel, Martin. 2000. The Four Gospels and the One Gospel of Jesus Christ: An Investigation of the Collection and Origin of the Canonical Gospels. Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International.

  31. Hieke, Thomas, ed. 2001. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 6:20-21. The Beatitudes for the Poor, Hungry, Mourning. Leuven: Peeters.

  32. Higgins, A. J. B. 1984. "Luke 1-2 in Tatian's Diatessaron." Journal of Biblical Literature no. 103:193-222.

  33. Hincks, Edward Y. 1891. "The Probable Use of the First Gospel by Luke." Journal of Biblical Literature no. 10:92-106.

  34. Hoard, George. 1978. "Stylistic Inversion and the Synoptic Tradition." Journal of Biblical Literature no. 97:375-389.

  35. Hobbs, Edward C. 1980. "A Quarter-Century Without "Q"." Perkins School of Theology Journal no. 33:10-19.

  36. Hobson, A. A. 1904. The Diatessaron of Tatian and the Synoptic Problem. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Being an investigation of the Diatessron for the light which it throws upon the solution of the problem of the origin of the synoptic gospels.

  37. Hodgson, Robert. 1985. "On the Gattung of Q: A Dialogue with James M. Robinson." Biblica no. 66:73-95.

  38. Hoffmann, Paul, Amon, Josef E., Brauner, Ulrike, Hieke, Thomas, BBoring, M- Eugene, and Asgeirsson, Jon Ma., eds. 1997. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 12:8-12. Confessing or Denying – Speaking against the Holy Spirit – Hearings before the Synagogues. Leuven: Peeters.

  39. Hoffmann, Paul, Brandenburger, Stefan H., Brauner, Ulrike, and Hieke, Thomas, eds. 1998. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 22:28, 30: You will judge the twelve tribes of Israel. Leuven: Peeters.

  40. Holladay, Carl R. 2005. A Critical Introduction to the New Testament: Interpreting the Message and Meaning of Jesus Christ. Nashville: Abingdon Press.

    Chapter 3: Relating the Gospels to Each Other, pp. 41-81.

  41. Honoré, A. M. 1968. "A Statistical Study of the Synoptic Problem." Novum Testamentum no. 10:95-147.

    Reprinted in: David E. Orton (ed.), The Synoptic Problem and Q: Selected Studies from Novum Testamentum, Leiden: Brill, 1999, pp. 70-122.

  42. Hooker, Morna D. 1992. "The Son of Man and the Synoptic Problem." In The Four Gospels 1992: Festschrift Frans Neirynck. Volume I, edited by van Segbroeck, Frans, Tuckett, Christopher M., van Belle, Gilbert and Verheyden, Joseph, 189-201. Leuven: Leuven University Press / Peeters.

  43. Horman, John. 2011. A Common Written Greek Source for Mark & Thomas. Waterloo (On): Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion.

    "This book uncovers an early collection of sayings, called N, that are ascribed to Jesus and are similar to those found in the Gospel of Thomas and in Q, a document believed to be a common source, with Mark, for Matthew and Luke. In the process, the book sheds light on the literary methods of Mark and Thomas. A literary comparison of the texts of the sayings of Jesus that appear in both Mark and Thomas shows that each adapted an earlier collection for his own purpose. Neither Mark nor Thomas consistently gives the original or earliest form of the shared sayings; hence, Horman states, each used and adapted an earlier source. Close verbal parallels between the versions in Mark and Thomas show that the source was written in Greek. Horman's conclusion is that this common source is N. This proposal is new, and has implications for life of Jesus research. Previous research on sayings attributed to Jesus has treated Thomas in one of two ways: either as an independent stream of Jesus sayings written without knowledge of the New Testament Gospels or as a later piece of pseudo-Scripture that uses the New Testament as source. This book rejects both views."

  44. Horsley, Richard A. 1999. "The Historical Context of Q." In Whoever Hears You Hears Me: Prophets, Performance, and Tradition in Q, edited by Horsley, Richard A. and Draper, Jonathan A., 46-60. Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.

  45. ———. 1999. "The Contours of Q." In Whoever Hears You Hears Me: Prophets, Performance, and Tradition in Q, edited by Horsley, Richard A. and Draper, Jonathan A., 61-93. Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.

  46. ———. 1999. "The Oral Communication Evironment of Q." In Whoever Hears You Hears Me: Prophets, Performance, and Tradition in Q, edited by Horsley, Richard A. and Draper, Jonathan A., 123-149. Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.

  47. ———. 1999. "Recent studies of oral-derived literature and Q." In Whoever Hears You Hears Me: Prophets, Performance, and Tradition in Q, edited by Horsley, Richard A. and Draper, Jonathan A., 150-174. Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.

  48. ———, ed. 2006. Oral Performance, Popular Tradition, and Hidden Transcript in Q. Leiden: Brill.

    Contents: Abbreviations VII; Richard A. Horsley: Introduction 1;

    Part One. Oral Performance and Popular Tradition in Q

    Essays

    Werner H. Kelber: The Verbal Art in Q and Thomas: A Question of Epistemology 25; Richard A. Horsley: Performance and Tradition: The Covenant Speech in Q 43; Jonathan A. Draper: Jesus’ “Covenantal Discourse” on the Plain (Luke 6:12–7:17) as Oral Performance: Pointers to “Q” as Multiple Oral Performance 71;

    Responses

    Joanna Dewey: Response to Kelber, Horsley, and Draper 101; Vernon K. Robbins: Oral Performance in Q: Epistemology, Political Conflict, and Contextual Register 109; John Miles Foley: The Riddle of Q: Oral Ancestor, Textual Precedent, or Ideological Creation? 123;

    Part Two

    Moral Economy and Hidden Transcript: Applying the Work of James C. Scott to Q

    Essays

    Richard A. Horsley: Moral Economy and Renewal Movement in Q 143; Milton Moreland: The Jesus Movement in the Villages of Roman Galilee: Archaeology, Q, and Modern Anthropological Theory 159; Alan Kirk: Going Public with the Hidden Transcript in Q 11: Beelzebul Accusation and the Woes 181; Melanie Johnson-DeBaufre: Communities Resisting Fragmentation: Q and the Work of James C. Scott 193;

    Response

    William R. Herzog II: The Work of James C. Scott and Q: A Response 211;

    Bibliography 217-226.

  49. Horsley, Richard A., and Draper, Jonathan A. 1999. Whoever Hears You Hears Me: Prophets, Performance and Tradition in Q. Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.

  50. Howard, George. 1978. "Stylistic Inversion and the Synoptic Tradition." Journal of Biblical Literature:375-389.

  51. Howes, L. 2015. "'Divided Against Himself'? Individuals Maxims and the Redaction of Q." Acta Theologica no. 35:96-114.

  52. Huggins, Ronald V. 1992. "Matthean Posteriority: A Preliminary Proposal." Novum Testamentum no. 34:1-22.

  53. Hultgren, Stephen. 2002. Narrative Elements in the Double Tradition: A Study of Their Place within the Framework of the Gospel Narrative. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

  54. ———. 2008. "The Apostolic Church’s Influence on the Order of Sayings in the Double Tradition. Part I: From John the Baptist to the Mission Discourse; and the Rest of Matthew." Zeitschrift für die Neutestamentliche Wissenschaft und Kunde der Älteren Kirche no. 99:185-212.

  55. ———. 2009. "The Apostolic Church’s Influence on the Order of Sayings in the Double Tradition. Part II: Luke’s Travel Narrative." Zeitschrift für die Neutestamentliche Wissenschaft und Kunde der Älteren Kirche no. 100:199-222.

  56. Humphrey, Hugh M. 2006. From Q to "Secret" Mark: A Composition History of the Earliest Narrative Theology. New York: T & T Clark.

  57. Jackson, Henry Latimer. 1909. "The Present State of the Synoptic Problem." In Essays on Some Biblical Questions of the Day, edited by Swete, Henry Barclay, 421-460. London: Macmillan.

  58. Jacobson, Arland Dean. 1982. "The Literary Unity of Q." Journal of Biblical Literature no. 101:365-389.

    Reprinted in John S. Kloppenborg (ed.), The Shape of Q: Signal Essays on the Sayings Gospel, Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 1994.

  59. ———. 2005. The First Gospel: An Introduction to Q. Eugene (OR): Wipf & Stock.

  60. Jameson, H. G. 1922. The Origin of the Synoptic Gospels: A Revision of the Synoptic Problem. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

  61. Jenkins, Geoffrey. 1994. "A Written Jerusalem Gospel Ύ": Reflections on the Socio-Politics of the Synoptic Problem." Pacifica no. 7:309-323.

  62. Johnson, Sherman E. 1991. The Griesbach Hypothesis and Redaction Criticism. Atlanta: Scholars Press.

  63. Johnson, Steven R., ed. 2001. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 7:1-10. The Centurion’s Faith in Jesus’ Word. Leuven: Peeters.

  64. ———, ed. 2007. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 12:33-34. Storing Up Treasures in Heaven. Leuven: Peeters.

  65. Johnson, Steven R., Steinhauser, Michael G., and Jolliffe, Ronald L., eds. 2014. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 13:34-35. Judgment over Jerusalem. Leuven: Peeters.

  66. Jolliffe, Ronald L., Harb, Gertraud, Heil, Christoph, Felber, Anneliese, and Magnes, Angelika, eds. 2012. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 11:39a, 42, 39b, 41, 43-44. Woes against the Pharisees. Leuven: Peeters.

  67. ———, eds. 2012. Documenta Q: Reconstructions of Q Through Two Centuries of Gospel Research. Excerpted, sorted, and evaluated: Q 11:46b, 52, 47-51. Woes against the exegetes of the Law. Wisdoms judgment on this generation. Leuven: Peeters.

  68. Jones, Brice C. 2011. Matthean and Lukan Special Material: A Brief Introduction with Texts in Greek and English. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock.

  69. Joseph, Simon J. 2012. Jesus, Q, and the Dead Sea Scrolls: A Judaic Approach to Q. Tübingen: Moh Siebeck.

  70. Kahl, Werner. 2016. "Towards a Neutral Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels, or Minor Agreements as Misleading Category." In Luke's Literary Creativity, edited by Nielsen, Jesper Tang and Müller, Mogens, 79-95. New York: Bloomsbury.

  71. Kelber, Werner H. 1983. The Oral and the Written Gospel: The Hermeneutics of Speaking and Writing in the Synoptic Tradition, Mark, Paul, and Q. Philadelphia: Fortress Press.

    Reprint: Bloomington: Indiana University Press 1997.

  72. Keown, Mark. 2018. Discovering the New Testament: An Introduction to Its Background, Theology, and Themes. Vol. 1: The Gospels & Acts. Bellingham, WA: Lexham.

    Chapter 5: The synoptic Gospels.

  73. Kilpatrick, G. D. 1946. The Origins of the Gospel accoring to St. Matthew. Oxford Oxford University Press.

  74. ———. 1984. "Matthew on Matthew." In Synoptic Studies: The Ampleforth Conferences of 1982 and 1983, edited by Tuckett, Christopher M., 177-186. Sheffield: JSOT Press.

  75. Kingsbury, Jack Dean. 1983. "The Theology of St. Matthew’s Gospel according to the Griesbach Hypothesis." In New Synoptic Studies: The Cambridge Gospel Conference and Beyond, edited by Farmer, William R., 331-361. Macon: Mercer University Press.

  76. Kirk, Alan. 1998. The Composition of the Sayings Source: Genre, Synchrony and Wisdom Redaction in Q. Leiden: Brill.

  77. ———. 2011. "Memory, Scribal Media, and the Synoptic Problem." In New Studies in the Synoptic Problem. Oxford Conference, April 2008: Essays in Honour of Christopher M. Tuckett edited by Foster, P., Gregory, A., Kloppenborg, John S. and Verheyden, Joseph, 459-482. Leuven: Peeters.

  78. ———. 2012. "Orality, Writing, and Phantom Sources: Appeals to Ancient Media in Some Recent Challenges to the Two Document Hypothesis." New Testament Studies no. 58:1-22.

  79. ———. 2016. Q in Matthew: Ancient Media, Memory, and Early Scribal Transmission of the Jesus Tradition. New York: Bloomsbury.

  80. ———. 2017. "The Synoptic Problem, Ancient Media, and the Historical Jesus. A Response." Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus no. 15:234-259.

    Abstract: The editors of JHJS have pulled together an ideal set of respondents to Q in Matthew: Robert Derrenbacker and Sarah Rollens, fellow alums of the University of Toronto program and representatives of the so-called ‘Toronto School’ of Q scholarship, Rafael Rodríguez, Synoptic source-critical agnostic and fellowtraveler in the world of ancient media, and Mark Goodacre, genial champion of the Farrar-Goulder hypothesis (fgh). I am grateful for the investment of time evident in their responses. While their expressions of appreciation for the work are welcome, naturally what is of most interest are the points they raise in critique. That this is a journal dedicated to historical Jesus research also raises the question of why the editors have seen fit to devote an issue to the Synoptic Problem debate. We will therefore conclude with reflections on the significance of the memory factor in the transmission of the Jesus tradition, as this becomes visible in Synoptic source relations, for historical Jesus enquiry."

  81. ———. 2020. "Memory, Tradition, and Synoptic Sources: The Quest ofHoltzmann and

    Wemle for a Pre-Dogma Jesus." In Theological and Theoretical Issues in the Synoptic Problem, edited by Kloppenborg, John S. and Verheyden, Joseph, 53-70. New York: Bloomsbury.

    "A grasp of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century scholarship on the Synoptic Problem is indispensable for putting our own debates in perspective. Though good surveys of this fascinating and pioneering period are available, (1) as yet untried angle is a media analysis - what role particular concepts of memory, oral tradition, and the written medium played in nineteenth-century synoptic scholarship, and just as

    importantly, what was at stake when critics invoked media factors in their histories of the synoptic tradition and gospel writing. In this exploratory probe we will focus on Heinrich Julius Holtzmann and Paul Wernle, two of the most consequential critics of that era. In particular, we will look at how they deployed memory, oral tradition, and written sources in their quest for a pre-dogma Jesus." (p. 53)

    (1) The best is John S. Kloppenborg, Excavating Q: The History and Setting of the Sayings Gospel (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress, 2000), chapters 6 and 7.

  82. Klinghardt, Matthias. 2008. "The Marcionite Gospel and the Synoptic Problem: A New Suggestion." Novum Testamentum no. 50:1-27.

    Abstract: "The most recent debate of the Synoptic Problem resulted in a dead-lock: The best-established solutions, the Two-Source-Hypothesis and the Farrer-Goodacre-Theory, are burdened with a number of apparent weaknesses. On the other hand, the arguments raised against these theories are cogent. An alternative possibility, that avoids the problems created by either of them, is the inclusion of the gospel used by Marcion. This gospel is not a redaction of Luke, but rather precedes Matthew and Luke and, therefore, belongs into the maze of the synoptic interrelations. The resulting model avoids the weaknesses of the previous theories and provides compelling and obvious solutions to the notoriously difficult problems."

  83. ———. 2017. "Marcion's Gospel and the New Testament: Catalyst or Consequence?" New Testament Studies no. 63:318-323.

    "In order to assess the importance of the Marcionite Gospel for the New Testament we must determine the editorial relation between this gospel and Luke: this is the basic problem for everybody dealing with the Marcionite Gospel, no matter whether for literary, historical or theological reasons. As I have argued in some detail elsewhere, I strongly believe that the direction of the editorial process linking the two texts runs from the Marcionite Gospel to Luke.(1) Only under this basic assumption does the full impact of the Marcionite Gospel become visible: with regard to the emergence of the gospel tradition, the understanding of the New Testament and its textual history, and many other – hitherto unanswered – questions.(2)" (p. 318)

    (1) M. Klinghardt, Das älteste Evangelium und die Entstehung der kanonischen Evangelien (2 vols.; TANZ 60/1-2; Tübingen: Francke, 2015). An English translation is in preparation. [The Oldest Gospel and the Formation of the Canonical Gospels: Inquiry. Reconstruction - Translation - Variants, Leuven, Peeters 2020]

    (2) These problems precede and outweigh even a critical reconstruction of the text of the Marcionite Gospel: significant parts of the heresiologists’ testimony, particularly the numerous contradictory attestations, will be evaluated according to the direction of the editorial process.

  84. Kloppenborg, John S. 1986. "The Formation of Q and Antique Instructional Genres." Journal of Biblical Literature no. 105:443-462.

  85. ———. 1987. "Symbolic Eschatology and the Apocalypticism of Q." The Harvard Theological Review no. 80:287-306.

  86. ———. 1990. "Nomos and Ethos in Q." In Gospel Origins & Christian Beginnings: In Honor of James M. Robinson, edited by Goehring, James E. , Sanders, Jack T. and Hedrick, Charles W., 35-48. Sonoma: Polebridge Press.

  87. ———. 1990. "City and Wasteland: Narrative World and the Beginning of the Sayings Gospel (Q)." Semeia no. 52:145-160.

  88. ———. 1991. "Literary Convention, Self-Evidence, and the Social History of the Q People." Semeia no. 55:77-102.

  89. ———. 1992. "The Theological Stakes in the Synoptic Problem." In The Four Gospels 1992: Festschrift Frans Neirynck. Volume II, edited by van Segbroeck, Frans, Tuckett, Christopher M., van Belle, Gilbert and Verheyden, Joseph, 93-120. Leuven: Leuven University Press / Peeters.

    Reprinted in: S. Kloppenborg, Synoptic Problems: Collected Essays, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2014, pp. 11-37.

  90. ———, ed. 1994. The Shape of Q: Signal Essays on the Sayings Gospel Minneapolis: Fortress Press.

    Contents: Acknowledgments V; Preface VII; John S. Kloppenborg: Introduction 1; 1. Rudolf Bultmann: : What the Saying Source Reveals about the Early Church 23; 2. Helmut Koester: The Synoptic Sayings Source and the Gospel of Thomas 35; 3. James M. Robinson: Jewish Wisdom Literature and the Gattung, LOGOI SOPHON 51; 4. Dieter Luhrmann: Q in the History of Early Christianity 59; 5. Heinz Schurmann: Observations on the Son of Man Title in the Speech Source: Its Occurrence in Closing and Introductory Expressions 74; 6. Arland D. Jacobson: The Literary Unity of Q 98; 8. Dieter Zeller: Redactional Processes and Changing Settings in the Q-Material 116; 9. Ronald A. Piper: Matthew 7:7-11 par. Luke 11:9-13: Evidence of Design and Argument in the Collection of Jesus’ Sayings 131; 10. John S. Kloppenborg: The Formation of Q and Antique Instructional Genres 138; 10. Migaku Sato: The Shape of the Q-Source156-179; Abbreviations 180; Bibliography 183; Index of Names 209; Index of Ancient Sources 212-224.

  91. ———, ed. 1995. Conflict and Invention: Literary, Rhetorical, and Social Studies on the Sayings Gospel Q. Valley Forge, PA: Trinity Press.

    Contents: 1. John S. Kloppenborg: Conflict and Invention: Recent Studies on Q; 2. Johnathan L. Reed: The Social Map of Q; 3. Richard Horsley: Social Conflict in the Synoptic Sayings Source of Q; 4. Ronald A. Piper: The Language of Violence and the Aphoristic Sayings in Q: A Study of Q 6:27-36; 5. Leif E. Vaage: Composite Texts and Oral Mythology: The Case of the "Sermon" in Q (6:20-49); 6. Shawn Carruth: Strategies of Authority: A Rhetorical Study of the Character of the Speaker in Q 6:20-49; 7. R. Conrad Douglas: "Love Your Enemies": Rhetoric, Tradents, and Ethos; 8. Wendy Cotter: "Yes, I Tell You, and More Than a Prophet": The Function of John in Q; 9. Patrick J. Hartin: "Yet Wisdom is Justified by Hew Children" (Q 7:35): A Rhetorical and Compositional Analysis of Divine Sophia in Q; 10. William Arnal: Redactional Fabrication and Group Legitimation: The Baptist's Preaching in Q 3:7-9, 16-17; 11. Leif E. Vaage: More than a Prophet, and Demon-Possessed: Q and the "Historical" John.

  92. ———. 1995. "Jesus and the Parables of Jesus in Q." In The Gospel behind the Gospels: Current Studies on Q, edited by Piper, Ronald A., 275-319. Leiden: Brill.

  93. ———. 1996. "The Sayings Gospel Q: Literary and Stratigraphic Problems." In Symbols and Strata: Essays on the Sayings Gospel Q, edited by Uro, Risto, 1-66. Helsinki: Finnish Exegetical Society.

    Reprinted in: S. Kloppenborg, Synoptic Problems: Collected Essays, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, pp. 266-321.

  94. ———. 1999. The Formation of Q: Trajectories in Ancient Wisdom Collections. Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International.

    Second edition with a new preface (First edition Philadelphia: Fortress Press 1987).

  95. ———. 1999. "Q (Sayings Gospel)." In Dictionary of Biblical Interpretation: Volume 2, edited by Hayes, John H., 343-346. Nashville: Abingdon.

  96. ———. 2001. "Discursive Practices in the Sayings Gospel Q and the Quest of the Historical Jesus." In The Sayings Source Q and the Historical Jesus, edited by Lindemann, Andreas, 149-190. Leuven: Peeters.

  97. ———. 2003. "On Dispensing with Q?: Goodacre on the Relation of Luke to Matthew." New Testament Studies no. 49:210-236.

    Reprinted in: S. Kloppenborg, Synoptic Problems: Collected Essays, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, pp. 62-90.

  98. ———. 2006. "Holtzmann's Life of Jesus according to the 'A' Source: Part 1." Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus no. 4:75-108.

    Abstract: "H.J. Holtztnann's Die synoptischen Evangelien (1863) is not only regarded as having established Markan priority and the basic contours of the Two Source hypothesis; it also offered a sketch of the life of Jesus based on a Mark-like source that represents a starting point for the so-called 'Liberal Lives of Jesus' which prevailed from 1863 until the early 1900s. Holtzmann's 'Life' portrayed Jesus as an exemplary personality, and posited psychological development in seven stages in the career of Jesus. This essay discusses the intellectual context leading to Holtzmann's book and then offers an annotated English translation of Holtzmann's 'Life of Jesus'. This is Part 1 of a two-part essay."

  99. ———. 2006. "Holtzmann's Life of Jesus according to the 'A' Source: Part 2." Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus no. 4:203-223.

  100. ———. 2007. "Variation in the Reproduction of the Double Tradition and an Oral Q?" Ephemeriudes Theologicae Lovanienses no. 83:53-80.

    Reprinted in: S. Kloppenborg, Synoptic Problems: Collected Essays, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, pp. 91-119.

  101. ———. 2008. Q, the Earliest Gospel: An Introduction to the Original Stories and Sayings of Jesus. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

  102. ———. 2008. "Q." In Encyclopedia of the Historical Jesus, edited by Evans, Craig A., 469-472. New York: Routledge.

  103. ———. 2011. "Gospels." In The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible: Vol. 1, edited by Coogan, Michael D., 334-349. New York: Oxford University Press.

    The Synoptic Problem, pp. 345-347.

  104. ———. 2014. Synoptic Problems: Collected Essays. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.

    Contents: Preface VII; Abbreviations XIII; Introduction 1;

    Part I: SYNOPTIC PROBLEMS 9

    1. The Theological Stakes in the Synoptic Problem 11; 2. Is there a New Paradigm? 39; 3. On Dispensing with Q? Goodacre on the Relation of Luke to Matthew 62; 4. Variation in the Reproduction of the Double Tradition and an Oral Q? 91; 5. Synopses and the Synoptic Problem 120;

    Part II:THE SAYINGS GOSPEL Q 155

    6. Symbolic Eschatology and the Apocalypticism of Q 157; 7. “Easter Faith” and the Sayings Gospel Q 179; 8. Nomos and Ethos in Q 204; 9. City and Wasteland: Narrative World and the Beginning of the Sayings Gospel (Q) 222; 10. Literary Evidence, Self-Evidence, and the Social History of the Q People 237; 11. The Sayings Gospel Q: Literary and Stratigraphic Problems 266; 12. A Dog Among the Pigeons: The ‘Cynic Hypothesis’ as a Theological Problem 322; 13. Discursive Practices in the Sayings Gospel Q and the Quest for the Historical Jesus 366;

    Part III: MARK 407

    14. Egyptian Viticultural Practices and the Citation of Isa 5:1–7 in Mark 12:1–9 409; 15. Self-Help or Deus ex Machina in Mark 12:9? 434; 16. Evocatio deorum and the Date of Mark 458; 17. Agrarian Discourse in the Sayings of Jesus 490;

    Part IV: PARABLES 513

    18. Jesus and the Parables of Jesus in Q 515; 19. The Parable of the Prodigal Son and Deeds of Gift 556; 20. Pastoralism, Papyri and the Parable of the Shepherd 577; 21. The Representation of Violence in the Synoptic Parables 600;

    Bibliography 631; Index of Modern Authors 697.

  105. ———. 2014. "A New Synoptic Problem: Mark Goodacre and Simon Gathercole on Thomas." Journal for the Study of the New Testament no. 36:199-239.

    Abstract: "Recent analyses of the Gospel of Thomas by Mark Goodacre and Simon Gathercole make only a partial and, in several instances, unconvincing case for Thomas’s knowledge of the Synoptic Gospels. Other neglected data suggests that some portions of Thomas are substantially autonomous. This calls for a more complex understanding of the composition of Thomas, one that recognizes its construction as a ‘school text’ or ‘anthology’, drawing on multiple and parallel streams of the Jesus tradition."

    References

    Gathercole, Simon 2012. The Composition of the Gospel of Thomas: Original Language and Influences (SNTSMS, 151; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).

    Goodacre, Mark S. 2012. Thomas and the Gospels: The Case for Thomas’s Familiarity with the Synoptics (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans).

  106. ———. 2015. "The Farrer/Mark Without Q Hypothesis: A Response." In Marcan Priority Without Q: Explorations in the Farrer Hypothesis, edited by Poirier, John C. and Peterson, Jeffrey, 226-244. London: T & T Clark.

    "It is an honour to be able to respond to the nine essays in this collection, some offering arguments that advance the case for the Farrer or Mark without-Q hypothesis, and others that raise issues with the positing of Q as a component of the Two Document hypothesis. In this response I will treat the essays that advance the FH first (Eve, Gorman, Abakuks, Peterson, Landry, Poirier), and then the remaining three essays (Carlson, Olson, Goodacre). Although Poirier's essay is entitled to suggest that it deals primarily with Q, it is in fact an analysis of Delbert Burkett's critique of the FH, and a defence of some of the key features of the FH, rather than simply a treatment of Burkett' s view of Q." (p. 226)

  107. ———. 2016. "Composing Matthew by Recomposing Q: The Composition of Matt 23–25." In An Early Reader of Mark and Q, edited by van Belle, Gilbert and Verheyden, Josef, 187-215. Leuven: Peeters.

  108. ———. 2017. "Conceptual Stakes in the Synoptic Problem." In Gospel Interpretation and the Q-Hypothesis, edited by Müller, Mogens, 13-42. New York: Bloomsbury.

  109. ———. 2018. "Oral and Literate Contexts for the Sayings Gospel Q." In Built on Rock or Sand? Q Studies: Retrospects, Introspects and Prospects, edited by Heil, Christoph, Harb, Gertraud and Smith, Daniel A., 49-72. Leuven: Peeters.

  110. ———. 2019. "Macro-Conflation, Micro-Conflation, Harmonization and the Compositional Practices of the Synoptic Writers." Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses no. 95:629-643.

  111. ———. 2020. "Camouflaging Q: The Catholic 2DH from Lagrange to Sickenberger and Beyond." In Theological and Theoretical Issues in the Synoptic Problem, edited by Kloppenborg, John S. and Verheyden, Joseph, 165-188. London: T & T. Clark.

    "The question posed in this chapter is not how Catholic scholars at the turn of the last century came to embrace the two-document hypothesis (2DH) - that is, the specific arguments that were made, although that too is important but what seems to have been at stake in them doing so. The matter is complicated by the fact that, as in the case of many treatments of the Synoptic Problem, the decision is often framed as simply a matter of historical or literary probability or even as "objective" scholarship; there is often very little reflection on what might be at stake, both conceptually and theologically, in a particular synoptic hypothesis.

    I hasten to add that this chapter does not take the view that synoptic hypotheses are embraced (or rejected) merely because they have or lack some perceived theological utility; that would be to misread the history of scholarship and this possibility was expressly rejected by scholars such as Marie-Joseph Lagrange and Friedrich Maier. Nevertheless, irrespective of the particular historical and literary grounds upon which a particular hypothesis is founded, there are theoretical "costs" and "advantages" entailed in that hypothesis. My interest is not in personal motivations, data for which is in almost all cases lacking, but rather in the larger theoretical or conceptual interests that may have been served by one or other synoptic hypothesis.(1)" (p. 165)

    (1) See Christopher M. Tuckett, "The Griesbach Hypothesis in the 19th Century," JSNT 3 (1979), 29-60 for an analogous exploration.

  112. Kloppenborg, John S., and Verheyden, Joseph, eds. 2020. Theological and Theoretical Issues in the Synoptic Problem. New York: Bloomsbury.

    Contents: Preface VI; Notes on Contributors VII; 1. Christopher Tuckett: Theological Issues at Stake in Early-Twentieth-Century Research on the Synoptic Problem 1; 2. Marijke H. de Lang: The Decline of the Gospel Harmony: Loss or Gain? 19: 3. Francis Watson: The Archaeology of the Q Hypothesis: The Case of H. J. Holtzmann; 4. Alan Kirk: Memory, Tradition, and Synoptic Sources: The Quest of Holtzmann and Wernle for a Pre-Dogma Jesus; 5. Markus Tiwald: Die Suche nach dem ,, Urevangelium" als Frage nach der Authentizitat der Jesustiberlieferung 71; 6. Paul Foster: The Rise of the Markan Priority Hypothesis and Early Responses and Challenges to It 89; 7. Daniel A. Smith: "No Weapon but That of Analysis": Issues at Stake in the Rise and Reception of the Two-Document Hypothesis 113; 8. Jens Schroter: The Synoptic Problem, the " Apocryphal Gospels," and the Quest of the Historical Jesus: Toward a Reformulation of the Synoptic Problem 135; 9. Benedict Thomas Viviano O.P.: French Catholic Scholarship on the Synoptic Problem in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries 151; 10. John S. Kloppenborg: Camouflaging Q: The Catholic 2DH from Lagrange to Sickenberger and Beyond 165; Bibliography 189; Inde.x of Names 211; Inde.x of References 217-220.

  113. Kloppenborg Verbin, John S. 2000. "Is There a New Paradigm?" In Christology, Controversy and Community. New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole, edited by Horrell, David G. and Tuckett, Christopher M., 23-47. Leiden: Brill.

    Reprinted in: S. Kloppenborg, Synoptic Problems: Collected Essays, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, pp. 39-61.

  114. ———. 2000. Excavating Q: The History and Setting of the Sayings Gospel. Minneapolis: Fortress Press.

    "This book explores two sets of issues crucial to the study of early Christianity: first, the basic methodological issues bearing on the identification and reconstruction of one of the earliest documents of the Jesus movement, and second, how so seemingly abstract and hypothetical a project has belonged and continues to belong to the history of discourse on early Christianity and what importance it has in that discourse. In short, it is a book on how one talks about Q, and why it matters.

    The motivations for this book are several. First, I have been thinking and writing about Q for two decades and have watched it transformed from a documentary source of rather limited interest into a major point of debate in matters of the delineation of the early Jesus movement and in the quest of the historical Jesus. With much work already accomplished, this seems a mod juncture at which to review and evaluate what has been done. Second, for the last several years I have also conducted a doctoral seminar on the Synoptic Problem, inviting students to examine seriously, sympathetically, and critically a variety of solutions to the Synoptic Problem—not only the two Document hypothesis (2DH), but the Two Gospel (Griesbach) hypothesis (2GH), the complex hypotheses of Vaganay, Boismard, and Rolland, The solution of the so-called Jerusalem school, and the Farrer-Goulder hypothesis. Part of my concern has been to ensure that graduate students appreciate both the strengths and weaknesses of various Synoptic solutions, and that they understand the difference between well and poorly constructed hypotheses." (From the Preface, IX)

  115. ———. 2002. "Goulder and the New Paradigm: A Critical Appreciation of Michael Goulder on the Synoptic Problem." In The Gospels Accordng to Michael Goulder: A North American Response, edited by Rollston, Christopher A., 29-60. Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.